Đề Xuất 3/2023 # The Difference Between “How Are You” And “How Are You Doing” # Top 3 Like | Comforttinhdauthom.com

Đề Xuất 3/2023 # The Difference Between “How Are You” And “How Are You Doing” # Top 3 Like

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Almost daily, we’re asked, “How are you?” The question-and its popular variation, “How are you doing?”-appears in emails from strangers and acquaintances and in polite face-to-face conversation. But what do we really know about this ubiquitous phrase?

What’s the difference between “How are you” and “How are you doing?”

The phrases sound similar, but in certain contexts, they may have subtly different meanings.

How are you? makes a slightly more personal inquiry about someone’s health or mood. It focuses on the person’s condition. It’s also a bit more formal than “How are you doing?”

How are you doing? is a general inquiry. It can ask about what’s going on in someone’s environment (similar to questions like, “How’s your day been so far?”) or in some contexts can mean “How are you faring?” or “Do you need anything?” (Think of a server approaching your table at a restaurant and asking, “How are we doing here?”) It’s considered a bit more casual and conversational than “How are you?”

In an audible conversation, the perceived differences between the two phrases can vary regionally. Take this example from a forum discussion on the topic:

In my experience as a native speaker in the Middle Atlantic region . . . “How are you?” is a bland greeting for someone you haven’t seen for a while, while “How are you doing?” . . . may be an actual inquiry. The latter is more common when there is some expectation that the subject might not be doing well.

For example: “Hey, haven’t seen you in ages! How are you?” versus . . . “How are you doing: is the new baby still keeping you up all night?”

-cricketswool on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange

When spoken, both phrases convey unique meanings depending on which word is accented. “How are you?” might come across as a one-size-fits-all greeting, but “How are you?” would have a more personal or sincere tone, or even one of concern. A rather flat “How are you doing?” can become outright flirtatious when spoken, “How are you doing?” (especially if you drop the “are” and affect your best Joey Tribianni accent.)

Which is more professional: “How are you?” or “How are you doing?”

When you write an email or other text greetings, the stakes change a bit. Which phrase sounds more professional?

Both phrases are appropriate for work correspondence, but stick to “How are you?” in more formal settings. It’s also better to use “How are you?” when you don’t know the correspondent very well-it’s generic enough to be considered a polite (if rather meaningless) gesture.

Here’s a tip: It’s okay to leave “How are you?” unanswered when responding to an email unless the answer is somehow pertinent.

5 Alternatives to Writing “How are you doing?” and “How are you?” in Email

Because they’re so ubiquitous, these phrases can disappear into the background or, worse, sound like insincere filler. And yet, sometimes you want to start an email with a bit of polite banter. Here are a few options.

1 It was fun to bump into you at [event]. Did you come away as fired up as I did?

If you know your contact, consider starting with something more personalized. A shared experience like a conference is always a good starting point, particularly if it’s relevant to the conversation to follow. Look for common ground and start from there.

2 I hope your day has been upbeat and productive.

Who doesn’t want an upbeat, productive day? Think about the other person’s work setting and come up with a few fun or clever ways to wish them well. Another example would be . . .

3 Are the ideas flowing along with the coffee?

Try something like this out on a Monday morning to beat the back-to-work doldrums.

4 I enjoyed your about [topic].

You don’t have to start with any friendly preamble. In fact, people who receive a lot of email will appreciate you getting straight to the point.

3 Ways to answer “How are you?” in Conversation

Most people agree it’s best not to take “How are you?” too literally. Although everyone asks, few people want you to recite a laundry list of the day’s events or personal struggles. Context clues will tell you whether the person asking is making a sincere inquiry about your welfare or just engaging in polite chit-chat.

We think your writing is beautiful.

That’s why we created the New Grammarly Editor-to match our users’ fantastic writing.

Have you tried it yet? #cleanwritinghttps://t.co/GxkYT3RONA

– Grammarly (@Grammarly) May 21, 2018

1 I’m fine, thanks. How are you?

By far the most socially acceptable response to “How are you?” is “Fine, thanks” with a reciprocal, “How are you?”

Here’s a tip: In many cultures, “How are you?” and “Fine, thanks; and you?” are treated as a polite social interaction and nothing more. Similar exchanges happen in other cultures. In China, people often greet one another with, “Hello! Have you eaten?” The answer is always a polite yes, regardless of your current state of hunger, and never an enthusiastic, “I could eat!”

2 I’m having one of those days. How about you?

This type of exchange is appropriate if you’ve come upon someone who seems to be having a challenging day and you want to share a little friendly commiseration. Be warned, though, that if the other person isn’t also having “one of those days,” you might seem as though you’re fishing for attention.

3 Happier than a seagull with a french fry!

If you’re in a good mood, there’s nothing wrong with sharing it. You might brighten someone’s day in the process. Can you think of a few clever similes to make your own?

Difference Between “How Are You?” And “How Are You Doing?”

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Asked

I’ve heard a lot of times that there is a major difference between saying:

How are you? andHow are you doing?

Is that true? I’ve heard one was like an extension of “Hello” and does not mean anything, so you should not answer it with “Fine, thank you. What about you?” but also with “How are you (doing)?” But I just don’t remember which of them means what.

Mari-Lou A

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Chris Chris

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In England, “How do you do?” was until recently a commonplace greeting. The correct response was, “How do you do?” This may be what you’re thinking of.

Both “How are you?” and “How are you doing?” should generally be taken as a question, to which the reply is often, “Fine, thanks!” or, more formally, “Very well, thank you.” However, the whole thing continues to confuse even English people, let alone visitors.

In my experience as a native speaker in the Middle Atlantic region, there is a slight difference. “How are you?” is a bland greeting for someone you haven’t seen for a while, while “How are you doing?” spoken in full (as opposed to being shortened to “Howyadoin?”) may be an actual inquiry. The latter is more common when there is some expectation that the subject might not be doing well.

For example: “Hey, haven’t seen you in ages! How are you?” versus “Sorry to hear about the diagnosis. How are you doing?” “I haven’t seen you since the funeral – how are you doing?” “How are you doing: is the new baby still keeping you up all night?”

“How are you?” should never be answered negatively or in too much detail. “Great,” “Fine,” and “Can’t complain” are all appropriate. “How are you doing?” may be answered the same way, but it also allows for a more honest and possibly more detailed response if you’re on close enough terms with the person asking.

There’s no real difference between ‘How are you?’ and ‘How are you doing?’ except the first asks for a statement of condition and the second asks for a statement of your fortunes. A reply to ‘How are you?’ should not sound like a list of medical ailments, misfortunes or stock market winnings. A simple ‘Couldn’t be better!’ is better. For a reply to ‘How are you doing?’a quick and positive answer is ‘Never better!’ These replies strike a note of cautious optimism and they are far more original than ‘Fine, thanks.’

I’m not a native speaker but I’ve spent some time in the US and studied English linguistics. I think that “How are you?” is a little bit more formal than “How are you doing?”.

You would say “How are you?” when you don’t know the person very well, or when you meet someone for the first time, whereas you would say “How are you doing?” when you already know someone, or act as if you already knew them. So “How are you doing?” is more warmful but it can be felt as a little too friendly in a formal context. Here’s an example from a rap song:

Hey how ya doin’? Sorry ya can’t get through Why don’t you leave your name And your number And I’ll get back to you

Ring Ring Ring ( Ha Ha Hey) De La Soul

Now, “How do you do?” is a set phrase in formal English and is considered as old-fashioned. When you met someone for the first time you would say “How do you do?” and the person would reply “How do you do?”, in a reciprocical way and with a handshake shared by both persons who meet, so the meaning was broadly that of “Nice to meet you”.

As a consequence, “How do you do?” lost the meaning of a real question but it used to have the meaning of a real one : when you meet someone it is polite to ask if that person is doing well.

In France, when you meet someone for the first time, you can say “Enchanté!”, which literally means “enchanted” or “delighted”, but it’s a set phrase too which has greatly lost its original meaning. This way of greeting people is old-fashioned, just like “How do you do?” in English. It may also sound too polite or a bit snobbish.

What’s more, I would like to point out that the verb DO is polysemous; “How are you doing?” has not the same meaning as “What are you doing?”. There are other examples:

Okay, Jimmy, that does it! (That’s enough! Stop it!)

Well, I guess that does it.(Alright, that’s a deal)

Good, that will do for today. (That will be enough)

How are you guys doing here? (Waitress addressing customers : Is everything all right?)

DO is a process verb: you can proceed through an action, that is perform an action (do one’s duty, do one’s homework, do the dishes), or you can proceed through an appreciation, as in “The firm doing great”. You can even “do time” if you go to prison.

You can also compare “How are you doing?” and “How is it going?”, which have about the same meaning. In this case you’re going nowhere in the common sense of the verb GO, but there’s still the abstract idea of motion as you ask a question that carries out a motion through an appreciation.

I believe that space and time are fundamental notions in the study of languages : if you go somewhere it takes some time, as when you do something it also takes some time.

Also from faran is the word farewell, now a synonym for goodbye. It’s a shortening of “May you fare well.”, Good bye coming from May God be with you.

In modern usage, to fare usually means “to do” or “to get along”:

How did you fare on your exam? I don’t think he’s faring too well in his new job.

In British English, a fare is also “the charge for using transport”, transportation in American English. Now, tranportation takes time to go from one place to another.

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The Same As; Similar To, Different From

Ngoài cách diễn đạt “as…as” để diễn đạt so sánh bằng, bạn có thể sử dụng cấu trúc “the same as”. Bài viết cũng sẽ giới thiệu cấu trúc “similar to” và “different from” để thể hiện sự so sánh giống – khác.

1. So sánh sự giống nhau với cấu trúc the same as

The same as có nghĩa là giống như. Cấu trúc này dùng để so sánh hai thứ giống hệt nhau.

Ví dụ:

Ann’s salary is the same as mine.

Tom is the same age as George.

‘What would you like to drink?’‘I’ll have the same as last time.’

Như vậy, có 2 cấu trúc của the same as.

The same as + Noun (Danh từ)

The same + Noun (Danh từ) + as

Ví dụ:

Với cấu trúc the same… as, theo sau the same là một danh từ chỉ kích cỡ, trọng lượng, màu sắc (đơn vị đo lường hoặc có thể so sánh được). Còn as (giới từ) theo sau bởi một danh từ hơn là một mệnh đề. Do đó, không có động từ ở cuối câu.

Ví dụ:

2. So sánh sự giống nhau với cấu trúc Similar to

Similar to có nghĩa là tương tự. Ta sử dụng cấu trúc này khi so sánh người/vật có nét tương đồng nhưng không giống hệt nhau. Đây chính là điểm phân biệt the same as và similar to.

Ví dụ:

A man found that a new Sony game is very similar to a Nintendo Switch hit.

I bought some new shoes which are very similar to a pair I had before.

Bạn có thể gặp hai trường hợp Giới từ “to” mang ý nghĩa “hướng tới” trong khi giới từ “with” lại có ý “ghép đôi”. Khi Lưu ý: similar to và A similar to B được dùng khi B là đối tượng phổ biến, được nhiều người biết đến và A có nhiều điểm tương đồng nên được so sánh giống với B. Trong khi đó, A similar with B có nghĩa là A và B đều phổ biến giống nhau và chúng được so sánh với nhau. similar with.

Thường thì người ta sẽ sử dụng similar to nhiều hơn.

3. So sánh sự khác nhau với cấu trúc different from

Different là tính từ nghĩa là “khác”. Khi so sánh 2 hay nhiều vật, ta thường sử dụng ” from “. Đây là hình thức phổ biến nhất.

Cấu trúc: Different from + Noun (Danh từ)

Ví dụ:

Humans are different from other animals.

Adam is so different from his brother.

Lưu ý: Ngoài different from, có thể sử dụng defferent to. Tuy nhiên, different to phổ biến hơn trong ngôn ngữ nói:

Ví dụ:

Humans are different from/to other animals.

Adam is so different from/to his brother.

Trong tiếng Anh – Mỹ, cũng có thể dùng different than. Trong tiếng Anh – Anh, có thể dùng different than trước một mệnh đề nhưng nhiều người coi cách dùng này không chính xác.

Ví dụ:

This tea tastes very different than the one I usually drink. (hoặc … very different from/to the one I usually drink)

His accent is different now than before he went to Australia. (hoặc … different now from before he went to Australia)

Comparison With Like; (Not) The Same As; Different From; (Not) As… As. — Tiếng Anh Lớp 8

+ like: được dùng để diễn đạt sự giống nhau nhau. Sau like là là một danh từ hoặc đại từ. [like + noun/pronoun] ex: You should have done it like this. (lẽ ra bạn nên làm điều đó như thế này này.) He ran like the wind. (Anh ta chạy như gió.) What a beautiful house! It’s like a palace. (Ngôi nhà thật tuyệt! Trong nó cứ nư một lâu đài vậy) You look like your mother. (Bạn trông giống mẹ bạn.)

Lưu ý: – Ta dùng as (không phải like) trước chủ ngữ + động từ Ex: I left everything as I found it. (Tôi đã để nguyên mọi vật như lúc tôi tìm thấy.) They did as they promised. (Họ làm đúng như họ đã hứa.) – Để ý rằng ta nói as usual/ as always. ex: You’re late as usual. (Bạn lại tới trễ như thường lệ.) – As cũng có khi là một giới từ. Ex: A few years ago I worked as a bus driver. (Trước đây vài năm tôi là tài xế xe buýt) (không nói ‘like a bus driver’)

+ the same as: được dùng để diễn đạt sự đồng nhất. Ex: The shirt on the shelf is the same as the one in the window. (Chiếc áo sơ mi trên kệ giống hệt như chiếc áo trong tủ kính.) You’ve got the same idea as me. (Bạn có ý kiến giống ý kiến tôi.) Her hair isn’t the same color as her mother’s. (Màu tóc của cô ta không giống màu tóc của mẹ cô ta.) Tom is the same age as Goerge. (Tom bằng tuổi Goerge.)

+ different from: được dùng diễn đạt sự khác nhau. Ex: She is very different from her sister. (Cô ta rất khác với chị của mình.) The new school isn’t much different from the old one. (Ngôi trường mới không khác mấy so với ngôi trường cũ.)

+ as … as: được dùng để diễn đặt sự ngang bằng nhau. ex: She speaks French as well as the French. (Cô ấy nói tiếng Pháp như người Pháp.) He is as tall as his father. (Anh ta cao bằng cha anh ta.) I’m sorry I’m late. I got here as fast as I could. (Xin lỗi tôi đến muộn. Tôi đã gawnsh hết sức đến đây thật nhanh.) -Trong câu so sánh phủ định, ta có thể dùng not as… as hoặc not so… as Ex: This flat isn’t as/so big our old one. (Căn hộ này không rộng bằng căn họ cũ của chúng tôi.) Tom isn’t as old as he looks. (Tom không lớn tuổi như vẻ bên ngoài đâu.)

The Difference Between “How Are You” And “How Are You Doing”

Almost daily, we’re asked, “How are you?” The question-and its popular variation, “How are you doing?”-appears in emails from strangers and acquaintances and in polite face-to-face conversation. But what do we really know about this ubiquitous phrase?

What’s the difference between “How are you” and “How are you doing?”

The phrases sound similar, but in certain contexts, they may have subtly different meanings.

How are you? makes a slightly more personal inquiry about someone’s health or mood. It focuses on the person’s condition. It’s also a bit more formal than “How are you doing?”

How are you doing? is a general inquiry. It can ask about what’s going on in someone’s environment (similar to questions like, “How’s your day been so far?”) or in some contexts can mean “How are you faring?” or “Do you need anything?” (Think of a server approaching your table at a restaurant and asking, “How are we doing here?”) It’s considered a bit more casual and conversational than “How are you?”

In an audible conversation, the perceived differences between the two phrases can vary regionally. Take this example from a forum discussion on the topic:

In my experience as a native speaker in the Middle Atlantic region . . . “How are you?” is a bland greeting for someone you haven’t seen for a while, while “How are you doing?” . . . may be an actual inquiry. The latter is more common when there is some expectation that the subject might not be doing well.

For example: “Hey, haven’t seen you in ages! How are you?” versus . . . “How are you doing: is the new baby still keeping you up all night?”

-cricketswool on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange

When spoken, both phrases convey unique meanings depending on which word is accented. “How are you?” might come across as a one-size-fits-all greeting, but “How are you?” would have a more personal or sincere tone, or even one of concern. A rather flat “How are you doing?” can become outright flirtatious when spoken, “How are you doing?” (especially if you drop the “are” and affect your best Joey Tribianni accent.)

Which is more professional: “How are you?” or “How are you doing?”

When you write an email or other text greetings, the stakes change a bit. Which phrase sounds more professional?

Both phrases are appropriate for work correspondence, but stick to “How are you?” in more formal settings. It’s also better to use “How are you?” when you don’t know the correspondent very well-it’s generic enough to be considered a polite (if rather meaningless) gesture.

Here’s a tip: It’s okay to leave “How are you?” unanswered when responding to an email unless the answer is somehow pertinent.

5 Alternatives to Writing “How are you doing?” and “How are you?” in Email

Because they’re so ubiquitous, these phrases can disappear into the background or, worse, sound like insincere filler. And yet, sometimes you want to start an email with a bit of polite banter. Here are a few options.

1 It was fun to bump into you at [event]. Did you come away as fired up as I did?

If you know your contact, consider starting with something more personalized. A shared experience like a conference is always a good starting point, particularly if it’s relevant to the conversation to follow. Look for common ground and start from there.

2 I hope your day has been upbeat and productive.

Who doesn’t want an upbeat, productive day? Think about the other person’s work setting and come up with a few fun or clever ways to wish them well. Another example would be . . .

3 Are the ideas flowing along with the coffee?

Try something like this out on a Monday morning to beat the back-to-work doldrums.

4 I enjoyed your about [topic].

You don’t have to start with any friendly preamble. In fact, people who receive a lot of email will appreciate you getting straight to the point.

3 Ways to answer “How are you?” in Conversation

Most people agree it’s best not to take “How are you?” too literally. Although everyone asks, few people want you to recite a laundry list of the day’s events or personal struggles. Context clues will tell you whether the person asking is making a sincere inquiry about your welfare or just engaging in polite chit-chat.

We think your writing is beautiful.

That’s why we created the New Grammarly Editor-to match our users’ fantastic writing.

Have you tried it yet? #cleanwritinghttps://t.co/GxkYT3RONA

– Grammarly (@Grammarly) May 21, 2018

1 I’m fine, thanks. How are you?

By far the most socially acceptable response to “How are you?” is “Fine, thanks” with a reciprocal, “How are you?”

Here’s a tip: In many cultures, “How are you?” and “Fine, thanks; and you?” are treated as a polite social interaction and nothing more. Similar exchanges happen in other cultures. In China, people often greet one another with, “Hello! Have you eaten?” The answer is always a polite yes, regardless of your current state of hunger, and never an enthusiastic, “I could eat!”

2 I’m having one of those days. How about you?

This type of exchange is appropriate if you’ve come upon someone who seems to be having a challenging day and you want to share a little friendly commiseration. Be warned, though, that if the other person isn’t also having “one of those days,” you might seem as though you’re fishing for attention.

3 Happier than a seagull with a french fry!

If you’re in a good mood, there’s nothing wrong with sharing it. You might brighten someone’s day in the process. Can you think of a few clever similes to make your own?

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